TCJ reviews New Yorker star cartoonist Roz Chast’s Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?

Like much of Chast’s work, Can’t We Talk is a formal triumph that at first glance looks somewhat a mess. The New Yorker‘s most stylistically experimental cartoonist, Chast draws single-panel cartoons and multipage nonfiction narratives for the magazine in addition to creating monumental lists, typologies, calendars, archaeologies, fake publications, and real children’s books. Chast rarely makes do with a single gag. Her cartoons are often mini-multiples. From the rocky collection of “little things” (“chent,” spak,” “kabe,” etc.) that comprised her first TNY cartoon, she has been the magazine’s preeminent underpromiser/overdeliverer. She also happens to be one of the magazine’s best writers, and the book gives her the space to expand on funny, anxious, and often infuriating things that happen in her cartoons when she wants to convey the full weight of the Chast clan’s considerable neurotic karma.

TCJ reviews New Yorker star cartoonist Roz Chast’s Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?

Like much of Chast’s work, Can’t We Talk is a formal triumph that at first glance looks somewhat a mess. The New Yorker‘s most stylistically experimental cartoonist, Chast draws single-panel cartoons and multipage nonfiction narratives for the magazine in addition to creating monumental lists, typologies, calendars, archaeologies, fake publications, and real children’s books. Chast rarely makes do with a single gag. Her cartoons are often mini-multiples. From the rocky collection of “little things” (“chent,” spak,” “kabe,” etc.) that comprised her first TNY cartoon, she has been the magazine’s preeminent underpromiser/overdeliverer. She also happens to be one of the magazine’s best writers, and the book gives her the space to expand on funny, anxious, and often infuriating things that happen in her cartoons when she wants to convey the full weight of the Chast clan’s considerable neurotic karma.

Paul Buhle reviews Bad for You: Exposing the War on Fun! over at TCJ:

Collaborators Pyle and Cunningham lay it out clearly, with recurrent references to would-be comic censor Fredric Wertham, and offer sophisticated, humorous explanations that I wish I’d had on hand in my teen years. They broaden the subject by bringing the supposed threats of jazz and rock ‘n roll to youth morality as the precursors to all the similar threats of the last forty years. For instance, Goth outfits, skateboards, video games, flash mobs, zombie marches—to mention only a few!

Read the full review.

Paul Buhle reviews Bad for You: Exposing the War on Fun! over at TCJ:

Collaborators Pyle and Cunningham lay it out clearly, with recurrent references to would-be comic censor Fredric Wertham, and offer sophisticated, humorous explanations that I wish I’d had on hand in my teen years. They broaden the subject by bringing the supposed threats of jazz and rock ‘n roll to youth morality as the precursors to all the similar threats of the last forty years. For instance, Goth outfits, skateboards, video games, flash mobs, zombie marches—to mention only a few!

Read the full review.

Comics&Cola reviews Vincent by Barbara Stok, Self Made Hero:

You have a person and images which are so widely ingrained in the consciousness of your audience, but Stok has chosen to go for a simple, clean, stylised cartooning with bright, vivid colours, an integral facet taking into account the material at hand. The way she illustrates Van Gogh’s illness, breaking up panels with sudden, jagged zig-zags, and a descending curtain of black dots- a pointillism almost, as everything around him becomes unclear, disorientating, is such an effective technique.

Read the full review.

Comics&Cola reviews Vincent by Barbara Stok, Self Made Hero:

You have a person and images which are so widely ingrained in the consciousness of your audience, but Stok has chosen to go for a simple, clean, stylised cartooning with bright, vivid colours, an integral facet taking into account the material at hand. The way she illustrates Van Gogh’s illness, breaking up panels with sudden, jagged zig-zags, and a descending curtain of black dots- a pointillism almost, as everything around him becomes unclear, disorientating, is such an effective technique.

Read the full review.

corinnemucha

corinnemucha:

My new graphic novel, "Get Over It!" debuts in just a week at TCAF!

Check out this nice little shout out on USA Today’s website!  

I’ll be at TCAF next weekend with Secret Acres.  Come say hi, comics folks!

The USA Today: “Mucha establishes herself as a cartoonist to watch with this graphic novel about how she got through a breakup.”