Review of Woman Rebel: The Margaret Sanger Story by The Comics Journal:

In Woman Rebel, Sanger, though her story is definitely of the superhero variety, comes across visually as Mary Poppins on a bad day — red-haired, booted, angry, her shoulders stooped, her mouth a weird worm crawling across her face. (I’ve seen pictures of Sanger and this isn’t even close; she’s actually quite fetching.)

Review of Woman Rebel: The Margaret Sanger Story by The Comics Journal:

In Woman Rebel, Sanger, though her story is definitely of the superhero variety, comes across visually as Mary Poppins on a bad day — red-haired, booted, angry, her shoulders stooped, her mouth a weird worm crawling across her face. (I’ve seen pictures of Sanger and this isn’t even close; she’s actually quite fetching.)

From Comics&Cola:

Weapons of Mass Diplomacy is Blain’s collaboration with Abel Lanzac, pen-name of Antonin Baudry, former speechwriter and advisor to French prime minister, Dominique de Villepin. The book is a fictionalised account of Lanzac’s experiences in the role at the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs (known as Quai d’Orsay), focusing on the run up to the invasion of Iraq- a political satire which won  the Grand Prix award at Angoulême in 2013, and was also recently adapted into a film…

From Comics&Cola:

Weapons of Mass Diplomacy is Blain’s collaboration with Abel Lanzac, pen-name of Antonin Baudry, former speechwriter and advisor to French prime minister, Dominique de Villepin. The book is a fictionalised account of Lanzac’s experiences in the role at the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs (known as Quai d’Orsay), focusing on the run up to the invasion of Iraq- a political satire which won  the Grand Prix award at Angoulême in 2013, and was also recently adapted into a film…

From Comics&Cola:

PICK OF THE MONTH: Vincent by Barbara Stok, Self Made Hero: I’m really looking forward to reading this- we had it in the store last week (a little early) and had to leave it behind as I had so many books, but have been thinking about it ever since. It’s a beautiful, attractive book, a biography of Van Gogh’s time in Provence where he plans to set up an artists studio for himself and his friends, plans which are thwarted by he suffers increasingly from attacks of mental illness. From what I’ve seen the combination of Dutch cartoonist Barbara Stok taking universally recognised imagery and simplifying it whilst retaining some of its essence and infusing it with a charm of its own, coupled with  an exploration of Van Gogh’s ideas about success, art, and life make this a winner.

Not 100% sure about the cheerful drawing style, but I am intrigued.

From Comics&Cola:

PICK OF THE MONTH: Vincent by Barbara Stok, Self Made Hero: I’m really looking forward to reading this- we had it in the store last week (a little early) and had to leave it behind as I had so many books, but have been thinking about it ever since. It’s a beautiful, attractive book, a biography of Van Gogh’s time in Provence where he plans to set up an artists studio for himself and his friends, plans which are thwarted by he suffers increasingly from attacks of mental illness. From what I’ve seen the combination of Dutch cartoonist Barbara Stok taking universally recognised imagery and simplifying it whilst retaining some of its essence and infusing it with a charm of its own, coupled with  an exploration of Van Gogh’s ideas about success, art, and life make this a winner.
Not 100% sure about the cheerful drawing style, but I am intrigued.
From Comics&Cola:

War of Streets and Houses belongs to the auto-bio comic book genre, but it manages to escape that by pacing itself like a dream or lucid recollection. Yanow appears, by construction, as the title’s key character, and we basically sift through her thoughts as she interprets a series of protests once participated in. Those events left a mark, and like anyone it’s that mark - that aftermath - that requires meaning. That’s your story. That and other things.

From Comics&Cola:

War of Streets and Houses belongs to the auto-bio comic book genre, but it manages to escape that by pacing itself like a dream or lucid recollection. Yanow appears, by construction, as the title’s key character, and we basically sift through her thoughts as she interprets a series of protests once participated in. Those events left a mark, and like anyone it’s that mark - that aftermath - that requires meaning. That’s your story. That and other things.