From Comics&Cola:

Listen up folks: Anne Emond’s comic for Retrofit is now available to pre-order, and you’re all going to need it. Emond’s been making comic strips for a while, and is probably best know for her Comiques- quintessentially sardonic, witty, black and white strips largely centered around the Emond persona, which somehow also manage to be warm and relate-able. One of my main problems with a lot of auto-bio is it’s so self-indulgent, but Emond’s work never feels like that -probably because it doesn’t actually read as auto-bio- her persona is very much an exaggerated character, and thus acts more readily as a reader interface. Her comics deal with the everyday, people observing, doubt, insecurity, life situations, with humour and intelligence, paired with her unique perspective. 

From Comics&Cola:

Listen up folks: Anne Emond’s comic for Retrofit is now available to pre-order, and you’re all going to need it. Emond’s been making comic strips for a while, and is probably best know for her Comiques- quintessentially sardonic, witty, black and white strips largely centered around the Emond persona, which somehow also manage to be warm and relate-able. One of my main problems with a lot of auto-bio is it’s so self-indulgent, but Emond’s work never feels like that -probably because it doesn’t actually read as auto-bio- her persona is very much an exaggerated character, and thus acts more readily as a reader interface. Her comics deal with the everyday, people observing, doubt, insecurity, life situations, with humour and intelligence, paired with her unique perspective. 

drawnandquarterly
drawnandquarterly:

bkbfcomics:

John Porcellino is coming to the Brooklyn Book Festival on 9/21/2014! 
About THE HOSPITAL SUITE
"[In The Hospital Suite, Porcellino’s] simple, black lines and bare-bones drawings have a powerful economy that present the story cleanly, without flourish, detailing a frightening and inescapable spiral into dysfunction without hyperbole. The result is a clear-eyed, penetrating book about the helplessness of illness which should bring Porcellino a wider audience beyond his cult following.” —Publishers Weekly, starred review

Yesss, check out John P’s full tour poster (though a few dates are still pending!) and make sure to find time to check in with him at the Brooklyn Book Festival on Sunday September 21st!

drawnandquarterly:

bkbfcomics:

John Porcellino is coming to the Brooklyn Book Festival on 9/21/2014! 

About THE HOSPITAL SUITE

"[In The Hospital Suite, Porcellino’s] simple, black lines and bare-bones drawings have a powerful economy that present the story cleanly, without flourish, detailing a frightening and inescapable spiral into dysfunction without hyperbole. The result is a clear-eyed, penetrating book about the helplessness of illness which should bring Porcellino a wider audience beyond his cult following.” —Publishers Weekly, starred review

Yesss, check out John P’s full tour poster (though a few dates are still pending!) and make sure to find time to check in with him at the Brooklyn Book Festival on Sunday September 21st!

Reviewed by Cynthia Rose over at TCJ:

Julie Birmant and Clément Oubrerie’s PABLO tackles something big: what – and who – turned a young Spanish painter into Picasso? Set between 1900 and 1909, their four-volume series covers Picasso’s earliest years in Paris. It’s a true story, but one whose details are largely forgotten. Birmant presents it with sympathy for the elements at its heart: youth, love, friendship and artistic transformation.
…
The series is based on Fernande Olivier’s memoir Souvenirs Intimes. Picasso’s first great love, Olivier is still known as “la belle Fernande“. Her book is a close-up view of the seven years she spent with the painter – mostly in the infamous Bateau Lavoir or “Laundry Boat”.

Reviewed by Cynthia Rose over at TCJ:

Julie Birmant and Clément Oubrerie’s PABLO tackles something big: what – and who – turned a young Spanish painter into Picasso? Set between 1900 and 1909, their four-volume series covers Picasso’s earliest years in Paris. It’s a true story, but one whose details are largely forgotten. Birmant presents it with sympathy for the elements at its heart: youth, love, friendship and artistic transformation.

The series is based on Fernande Olivier’s memoir Souvenirs Intimes. Picasso’s first great love, Olivier is still known as “la belle Fernande“. Her book is a close-up view of the seven years she spent with the painter – mostly in the infamous Bateau Lavoir or “Laundry Boat”.

TCJ reviews New Yorker star cartoonist Roz Chast’s Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?

Like much of Chast’s work, Can’t We Talk is a formal triumph that at first glance looks somewhat a mess. The New Yorker‘s most stylistically experimental cartoonist, Chast draws single-panel cartoons and multipage nonfiction narratives for the magazine in addition to creating monumental lists, typologies, calendars, archaeologies, fake publications, and real children’s books. Chast rarely makes do with a single gag. Her cartoons are often mini-multiples. From the rocky collection of “little things” (“chent,” spak,” “kabe,” etc.) that comprised her first TNY cartoon, she has been the magazine’s preeminent underpromiser/overdeliverer. She also happens to be one of the magazine’s best writers, and the book gives her the space to expand on funny, anxious, and often infuriating things that happen in her cartoons when she wants to convey the full weight of the Chast clan’s considerable neurotic karma.

TCJ reviews New Yorker star cartoonist Roz Chast’s Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?

Like much of Chast’s work, Can’t We Talk is a formal triumph that at first glance looks somewhat a mess. The New Yorker‘s most stylistically experimental cartoonist, Chast draws single-panel cartoons and multipage nonfiction narratives for the magazine in addition to creating monumental lists, typologies, calendars, archaeologies, fake publications, and real children’s books. Chast rarely makes do with a single gag. Her cartoons are often mini-multiples. From the rocky collection of “little things” (“chent,” spak,” “kabe,” etc.) that comprised her first TNY cartoon, she has been the magazine’s preeminent underpromiser/overdeliverer. She also happens to be one of the magazine’s best writers, and the book gives her the space to expand on funny, anxious, and often infuriating things that happen in her cartoons when she wants to convey the full weight of the Chast clan’s considerable neurotic karma.